Mental callouses

In describing writing his second book, Tom Leinster says

… I’m older and, I hope, more able to cope with stress: just as carpenters get calloused hands that make them insensitive to small abrasions, I like to imagine that academics get calloused minds that allow them not to be bothered by small stresses and strains.

Mental callouses are an interesting metaphor. Without the context above, “calloused minds” would have a negative connotation. We say people are calloused or insensitive if they are unconcerned for other people, but Leinster is writing of people unperturbed by distractions.

You could read the quote above as implying that only academics develop mental discipline, though I’m sure that’s not what was intended. Leinster is writing a personal post about the process of writing books. He’s an academic, and so he speaks of academics.

Not only do carpenters become more tolerant of minor abrasions, they also become better at avoiding them. I’m not sure that I’m becoming more tolerant of stress and distractions as I get older, but I do think I’m getting a little better at anticipating and avoiding stress and distractions.

 

 

3 thoughts on “Mental callouses

  1. That’s interesting, I did not know that in english “callous” implies sb. who’s emotionally, rather than phisically hardened.

    It may be fun to note that in latin the adjective derived from callus, “callide”, originally meant somebody who’s intelligent, expert, even shrewd.

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