Generating Python code from SymPy

Yesterday I wrote about Householder’s higher-order generalizations of Newton’s root finding method. For n at least 2, define

H_n(x) = x + (n-1) \frac{\left( \frac{1}{f(x)}\right)^{(n-2)}}{\left( \frac{1}{f(x)}\right)^{(n-1)}}

and iterate Hn to find a root of f(x). When n = 2, this is Newton’s method. In yesterday’s post I used Mathematica to find expressions for H3 and H4, then used Mathematica’s FortranForm[] function to export Python code. (Mathematica doesn’t have a function to export Python code per se, but the Fortran syntax was identical in this case.)

Aaron Muerer pointed out that it would have been easier to generate the Python code in Python using SymPy to do the calculus and labdify() to generate the code. I hadn’t heard of lambdify before, so I tried out his suggestion. The resulting code is nice and compact.

    from sympy import diff, symbols, lambdify

    def f(x, a, b):
        return x**5 + a*x + b

    def H(x, a, b, n):
        x_, a_, b_ = x, a, b
        x, a, b = symbols('x a b')
        expr = diff(1/f(x,a,b), x, n-2) / \
               diff(1/f(x,a,b), x, n-1)
        g = lambdify([x,a,b], expr)
        return x_ + (n-1)*g(x_, a_, b_)

This implements all the Hn at once. The previous post implemented three of the Hn separately.

The first couple lines of H require a little explanation. I wanted to use the same names for the numbers that the function H takes and the symbols that SymPy operated on, so I saved the numbers to local variables.

This code is fine for a demo, but in production you’d want to generate the function g once (for each n) and save the result rather than generating it on every call to H.

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