Fraktur symbols in mathematics

When mathematicians run out of symbols, they turn to other alphabets. Most math symbols are Latin or Greek letters, but occasionally you’ll run into Russian or Hebrew letters.

Sometimes math uses a new font rather than a new alphabet, such as Fraktur. This is common in Lie groups when you want to associate related symbols to a Lie group and its Lie algebra. By convention a Lie group is denoted by an ordinary Latin letter and its associated Lie algebra is denoted by the same letter in Fraktur font.

lower case alphabet in Fraktur

LaTeX

To produce Fraktur letters in LaTeX, load the amssymb package and use the command \mathfrak{}.

Symbols such as \mathfrak{A} are math symbols and can only be used in math mode. They are not intended to be a substitute for setting text in Fraktur font. This is consistent with the semantic distinction in Unicode described below.

Unicode

The Unicode standard tries to distinguish the appearance of a symbol from its semantics, though there are compromises. For example, the Greek letter Ω has Unicode code point U+03A9 but the symbol Ω for electrical resistance in Ohms is U+2621 even though they are rendered the same [1].

The letters a through z, rendered in Fraktur font and used as mathematical symbols, have Unicode values U+1D51E through U+1D537. These values are in the “Supplementary Multilingual Plane” and do not commonly have font support [2].

The corresponding letters A through Z are encoded as U+1D504 through U+1D51C, though interestingly a few letters are missing. The code point U+1D506, which you’d expect to be Fraktur C, is reserved. The spots corresponding to H, I, and R are also reserved. Presumably these are reserved because they are not commonly used as mathematical symbols. However, the corresponding bold versions U+1D56C through U+ID585 have no such gaps [3].

Footnotes

[1] At least they usually are. A font designer could choose provide different glyphs for the two symbols. I used the same character for both because some I thought some readers might not see the Ohm symbol properly rendered.

[2] If you have the necessary fonts installed you should see the alphabet in Fraktur below:
𝔞 𝔟 𝔠 𝔡 𝔢 𝔣 𝔤 𝔥 𝔦 𝔧 𝔨 𝔩 𝔪 𝔫 𝔬 𝔭 𝔮 𝔯 𝔰 𝔱 𝔲 𝔳 𝔴 𝔵 𝔶 𝔷

I can see these symbols from my desktop and from my iPhone, but not from my Android tablet. Same with the symbols below.

[3] Here are the bold upper case and lower case Fraktur letters in Unicode:
𝕬 𝕭 𝕮 𝕯 𝕰 𝕱 𝕲 𝕳 𝕴 𝕵 𝕶 𝕷 𝕸 𝕹 𝕺 𝕻 𝕼 𝕽 𝕾 𝕿 𝖀 𝖁 𝖂 𝖃 𝖄 𝖅
𝖆 𝖇 𝖈 𝖉 𝖊 𝖋 𝖌 𝖍 𝖎 𝖏 𝖐 𝖑 𝖒 𝖓 𝖔 𝖕 𝖖 𝖗 𝖘 𝖙 𝖚 𝖛 𝖜 𝖝 𝖞 𝖟

Why don’t you simply use XeTeX?

From an FAQ post I wrote a few years ago:

This may seem like an odd question, but it’s actually one I get very often. On my TeXtip twitter account, I include tips on how to create non-English characters such as using \AA to produce Å. Every time someone will ask “Why not use XeTeX and just enter these characters?”

If you can “just enter” non-English characters, then you don’t need a tip. But a lot of people either don’t know how to do this or don’t have a convenient way to do so. Most English speakers only need to type foreign characters occasionally, and will find it easier, for example, to type \AA or \ss than to learn how to produce Å or ß from a keyboard. If you frequently need to enter Unicode characters, and know how to do so, then XeTeX is great.

One does not simply type Unicode characters.

More Unicode posts

Graphemes

Here’s something amusing I ran across in the glossary of Programming Perl:

grapheme A graphene is an allotrope of carbon arranged in a hexagonal crystal lattice one atom thick. Grapheme, or more fully, a grapheme cluster string is a single user-visible character, which in turn may be several characters (codepoints) long. For example … a “ȫ” is a single grapheme but one, two, or even three characters, depending on normalization.

In case the character ȫ doesn’t display correctly for you, here it is:

Unicode character U_022B

First, graphene has little to do with grapheme, but it’s geeky fun to include it anyway. (Both are related to writing. A grapheme has to do with how characters are written, and the word graphene comes from graphite, the “lead” in pencils. The origin of grapheme has nothing to do with graphene but was an analogy to phoneme.)

Second, the example shows how complicated the details of Unicode can get. The Perl code below expands on the details of the comment about ways to represent ȫ.

This demonstrates that the character . in regular expressions matches any single character, but \X matches any single grapheme. (Well, almost. The character . usually matches any character except a newline, though this can be modified via optional switches. But \X matches any grapheme including newline characters.)

   
# U+0226, o with diaeresis and macron 
my $a = "\x{22B}"; 

# U+00F6 U+0304, (o with diaeresis) + macron 
my $b = "\x{F6}\x{304}";    
     
# o U+0308 U+0304, o + diaeresis + macron   
my $c = "o\x{308}\x{304}"; 

my @versions = ($a, $b, $c);

# All versions display the same.
say @versions;

# The versions have length 1, 2, and 3.
# Only $a contains one character and so matches .
say map {length $_ if /^.$/} @versions;

# All versions consist of one grapheme.
say map {length $_ if /^\X$/} @versions;

For daily tips on regular expressions, follow @RegexTip on Twitter.

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Notes on HTML, XML, TeX, and Unicode

This week’s resource post: some notes on typesetting, Unicode, etc.

See also blog posts tagged LaTeX, HTML, and Unicode.

For daily tips on LaTeX and typography, follow @TeXtip on Twitter.

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Last week: C++ resources

Next week: Special functions

 

Which Unicode characters can you depend on?

Unicode is supported everywhere, but font support for Unicode characters is sparse. When you use any slightly uncommon character, you have no guarantee someone else will be able to see it.

I’m starting a Twitter account @MusicTheoryTip and so I wanted to know whether I could count on followers seeing music symbols. I asked whether people could see ♭ (flat, U+266D), ♮ (natural, U+266E), and ♯ (sharp, U+266F). Most people could see all three symbols, from desktop or phone, browser or Twitter app. However, several were unable to see the natural sign from an Android phone, whether using a browser or a Twitter app. One person said none of the symbols show up on his Blackberry.

I also asked @diff_eq followers whether they could see the math symbols ∂ (partial, U+2202), Δ (Delta, U+0394), and ∇ (gradient, U+2207). One person said he couldn’t see the gradient symbol, but the rest of the feedback was positive.

So what characters can you count on nearly everyone being able to see? To answer this question, I looked at the characters in the intersection of several common fonts: Verdana, Georgia, Times New Roman, Arial, Courier New, and Droid Sans. My thought was that this would make a very conservative set of characters.

There are 585 characters supported by all the fonts listed above. Most of the characters with code points up to U+01FF are included. This range includes the code blocks for Basic Latin, Latin-1 Supplement, Latin Extended-A, and some of Latin Extended-B.

The rest of the characters in the intersection are Greek and Cyrillic letters and a few scattered symbols. Flat, natural, sharp, and gradient didn’t make the cut.

There are a dozen math symbols included:

0x2202 ∂
0x2206 ∆
0x220F ∏
0x2211 ∑
0x2212 −
0x221A √
0x221E ∞
0x222B ∫
0x2248 ≈
0x2260 ≠
0x2264 ≤
0x2265 ≥

Interestingly, even in such a conservative set of characters, there are a three characters included for semantic distinction: the minus sign (i.e. not a hyphen), the difference operator (i.e. not the Greek letter Delta), and the summation operator (i.e. not the Greek letter Sigma).

And in case you’re interested, here’s the complete list of the Unicode characters in the intersection of the fonts listed here. (Update: Added notes to indicate the start of a new code block and listed some of the isolated characters.)

0x0009           Basic Latin
0x000d
0x0020 - 0x007e 
0x00a0 - 0x017f  Latin-1 supplement
0x0192	         
0x01fa - 0x01ff
0x0218 - 0x0219  
0x02c6 - 0x02c7  
0x02c9
0x02d8 - 0x02dd 
0x0300 - 0x0301 
0x0384 - 0x038a  Greek and Coptic
0x038c
0x038e - 0x03a1
0x03a3 - 0x03ce
0x0401 - 0x040c 
0x040e - 0x044f  Cyrillic
0x0451 - 0x045c
0x045e - 0x045f
0x0490 - 0x0491
0x1e80 - 0x1e85  Latin extended additional
0x1ef2 - 0x1ef3
0x200c - 0x200f  General punctuation
0x2013 - 0x2015
0x2017 - 0x201e
0x2020 - 0x2022
0x2026
0x2028 - 0x202e
0x2030
0x2032 - 0x2033
0x2039 - 0x203a
0x203c
0x2044
0x206a - 0x206f  
0x207f           
0x20a3 - 0x20a4  Currency symbols ₣ ₤
0x20a7           ₧
0x20ac           €
0x2105           Letterlike symbols ℅
0x2116           №
0x2122           ™
0x2126           Ω
0x212e           ℮
0x215b - 0x215e  ⅛ ⅜ ⅝ ⅞
0x2202 	         Mathematical operators ∂
0x2206           ∆
0x220f           ∏
0x2211 - 0x2212  ∑ −
0x221a           √
0x221e           ∞
0x222b           ∫
0x2248           ≈
0x2260           ≠
0x2264 - 0x2265  ≤ ≥
0x25ca           Box drawing ◊
0xfb01 - 0xfb02  Alphabetic presentation forms fi fl

Unicode to LaTeX

I’ve run across a couple web sites that let you enter a LaTeX symbol and get back its Unicode value. But I didn’t find a site that does the reverse, going from Unicode to LaTeX, so I wrote my own.

Unicode / LaTeX Conversion

If you enter Unicode, it will return LaTeX. If you enter LaTeX, it will return Unicode. It interprets a string starting with “U+” as a Unicode code point, and a string starting with a backslash as a LaTeX command.

screenshot of www.johndcook.com/unicode_latex.png

For example, the screenshot above shows what happens if you enter U+221E and click “convert.” You could also enter infty and get back U+221E.

However, if you go from Unicode to LaTeX to Unicode, you won’t always end up where you started. There may be multiple Unicode values that map to a single LaTeX symbol. This is because Unicode is semantic and LaTeX is not. For example, Unicode distinguishes between the Greek letter Ω and the symbol Ω for ohms, the unit of electrical resistance, but LaTeX does not.

* * *

For daily tips on LaTeX and typography, follow @TeXtip on Twitter.

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Letters that fell out of the alphabet

Mental Floss had an interesting article called 12 letters that didn’t make the alphabet. A more accurate title might be 12 letters that fell out of the modern English alphabet.

I thought it would have been better if the article had included the Unicode values of the letters, so I did a little research and created the following table.

Name Capital Small
Thorn U+00DE U+00FE
Wynn U+01F7 U+01BF
Yogh U+021C U+021D
Ash U+00C6 U+00E6
Eth U+00D0 U+00F0
Ampersand U+0026
Insular g U+A77D U+1D79
Thorn with stroke U+A764 U+A765
Ethel U+0152 U+0153
Tironian ond U+204A
Long s U+017F
Eng U+014A U+014B

 

Once you know the Unicode code point for a symbol, you can find out more about it, for example, here.

Draw a symbol, look it up

LaTeX users may know about Detexify, a web site that lets you draw a character then looks up its TeX command. Now there’s a new site Shapecatcher that does the same thing for Unicode. According to the site, “Currently, there are 10,007 Unicode character glyphs in the database.” It does not yet support Chinese, Japanese, or Korean.

For example, I drew a treble clef on the page:

The site came back with a list of possible matches, and the first one was what I was hoping for:

Interestingly, the sixth possible match on the list was a symbol for contour integration:

Notice the treble clef response has a funny little box on the right side. That’s because my browser did not have a glyph to display that Unicode character. The browser did have a glyph for the contour integration symbol and displayed it.

Another Unicode resource I recommend is this Unicode Codepoint Chart. It is organized by code point value, in blocks of 256. If you were looking for the contour integration symbol above, for example, you could click on a link “U+2200 to U+22FF: Mathematical Operators” and see a grid of 256 symbols and click on the one you’re looking for. This site gives more detail about each character than does Shapecatcher. So you might use Shapecatcher to find where to start looking, then go to the Unicode Codepoint Chart to find related symbols or more details.

Other posts on Unicode:

For daily tips on LaTeX and typography, follow @TeXtip on Twitter.

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The disappointing state of Unicode fonts

Modern operating systems understand Unicode internally, but font support for Unicode is spotty. For an example of the problems this can cause, take a look at these screen shots of how the same Twitter message appears differently depending on what program is used to read it.

No font can display all Unicode characters. According to Wikipedia

… it would be impossible to create such a font in any common font format, as Unicode includes over 100,000 characters, while no widely-used font format supports more than 65,535 glyphs.

However, the biggest problem isn’t the number of characters a font can display. Most Unicode characters are quite rare. About 30,000 characters are enough to display the vast majority of characters in use in all the world’s languages as well as a generous selection of symbols. However Unicode fonts vary greatly in their support even for the more commonly used ranges of characters. See this comparison chart. The only range completely covered by all Unicode fonts in the chart is the 128 characters of Latin Extended-A.

Unifont supports all printable characters in the basic multilingual plane, characters U+0000 through U+FFFF. This includes the 30,000 characters mentioned above plus many more. Unifont isn’t pretty, but it’s complete. As far as I know, it’s the only font that covers the characters below U+FFFF.

More Unicode posts