Blog Archives

Irreproducible research on 60 Minutes

If your research cannot be reproduced, you might end up on 60 Minutes. Two days ago the new show ran a story about irreproducible research at Duke. You can find the video clip here. I believe the 60 Minutes piece

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Posted in Science

Running Python and R inside Emacs

Emacs org-mode lets you manage blocks of source code inside a text file. You can execute these blocks and have the output display in your text file. Or you could export the file, say to HTML or PDF, and show

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Posted in Python

Bad science is tolerable, résumé padding is not

The Economist posted an article online this weekend about the scandal over irreproducible cancer research by Anil Potti. My colleagues Keith Baggerly and Kevin Coombes have been crying foul about this since 2007. I first blogged about it in January

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Posted in Science

Scientific results fading over time

A recent article in The New Yorker gives numerous examples of scientific results fading over time. Effects that were large when first measured become smaller in subsequent studies. Firmly established facts become doubtful. It’s as if scientific laws are being

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Posted in Science, Statistics

Taking your code for a walk

When I was in college, a friend of mine told me he liked to take his code out for a walk every now and then. By that he meant recompiling and running all of his programs, say once a week.

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Posted in Software development

Popular research areas produce more false results

The more active a research area is, the less reliable its results are. John Ioannidis suggested popular areas of research publish a greater proportion of false results in his paper Why most published research findings are false. Of course popular

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Posted in Science, Statistics

Camtasia as a software deployment tool

Last week .NET Rocks mentioned a good idea in passing: start a screencast tool like Camtasia before you do a software install. Michael Learned, told the story of a client that asked him to take screen shots of every step

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Posted in Software development

Highlights from Reproducible Ideas

Here are some of my favorite posts from the Reproducible Ideas blog. Three reasons to distrust microarray results Provenance in art and science Forensic bioinformatics (continued) Preserving (the memory of) documents Programming is understanding Musical chairs and reproducibility drills Taking

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Posted in Science, Software development

Blogging about reproducible research

I’m in the process of folding ReproducibleResearch.org into the new ReproducibleResearch.net site. I will be giving the .org domain name to the folks now running the .net site. (See the announcement for a little more information.) As part of this

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Posted in Science

Taking your code out for a walk

I posted two articles on the Reproducible Ideas blog this morning. Taking your code out for a walk Just because you haven’t changed your code doesn’t mean it still works. CiSE special issue on reproducible research The latest issue of

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Posted in Computing

Rotating programmers

I just posted an article on my other blog, Reproducible Ideas, called Musical chairs and reproducibility drills. The post is about rotating programmers, in classes and in professional software development. The post ends with some thoughts on having a build

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Posted in Software development

Two posts on reproducibility: art and oceanography

On my other blog, Reproducible Ideas, I wrote two short posts about this morning about reproducibility. The first post is a pointer to an interview with Roger Barga about Trident, a workflow system for reproducible oceanographic research using Microsoft’s workflow

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Posted in Computing, Science

New blog on reproducible research

Yesterday I added a blog to the ReproducibleResearch.org web site. You can visit the site here or subscribe via RSS. I’d like a couple people to join me in writing this blog, and I would greatly appreciate suggestions, guest posts, etc.

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Posted in Uncategorized

Using Photoshop on experimental results

Greg Wilson pointed out an article in The Chronicle of Higher Education about scientists using Photoshop to manipulate the graphs of their results. The article has this to say about The Journal of Cell Biology. So far the journal’s editors have

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Posted in Science

ReproducibleResearch.org

I started a new web site this week, http://www.reproducibleresearch.org, to promote reproducible research. I’d like to see this become a community site. Depending on how much interest the site stirs up, I may add a blog, a Wiki, etc. For now,

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Posted in Software development, Statistics