Trademark symbol, LaTeX, and Unicode

Earlier this year I was a coauthor on a paper about the Cap Score™ test for male fertility from Androvia Life Sciences [1]. I just noticed today that when I added the publication to my CV, it caused some garbled text to appear in the PDF.

garbled LaTeX output

Here is the corresponding LaTeX source code.

LaTeX source

Fixing the LaTeX problem

There were two problems: the trademark symbol and the non-printing symbol denoted by a red underscore in the source file. The trademark was a non-ASCII character (Unicode U+2122) and the underscore represented a non-printing (U+00A0). At first I only noticed the trademark symbol, and I fixed it by including a LaTeX package to allow Unicode characters:

    \usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc}

An alternative fix, one that doesn’t require including a new package, would be to replace the trademark Unicode character with \texttrademark\. Note the trailing backslash. Without the backslash there would be no space after the trademark symbol. The problem with the unprintable character would remain, but the character could just be deleted.

Trademark and Unicode

I found out there are two Unicode code points render the trademark glyph, U+0099 and U+2122. The former is in the Latin 1 Supplement section and is officially a control character. The correct code point for the trademark symbol is the latter. Unicode files U+2122 under Letterlike Symbols and gives it the official name TRADE MARK SIGN.

Related posts

[1] Jay Schinfeld, Fady Sharara, Randy Morris, Gianpiero D. Palermo, Zev Rosenwaks, Eric Seaman, Steve Hirshberg, John Cook, Cristina Cardona, G. Charles Ostermeier, and Alexander J. Travis. Cap-Score™ Prospectively Predicts Probability of Pregnancy, Molecular Reproduction and Development. To appear.

Typesetting modal logic

Modal logic extends propositional logic with two new operators, □ (“box”) and ◇ (“diamond”). There are many interpretations of these two symbols, the most common being necessity and possibility respectively. That is, □p means the proposition p is necessary, and ◇p means that p is possible. Another interpretation is using the symbols to represent things a person knows to be true and things that may be true as far as that person knows.

There are also many axiom systems for inference concerning these operators. For example, some axiom systems include the rule

\Box p \rightarrow \Box \Box p

and some do not. If you interpret □ as saying a proposition is provable, this axiom says whatever is provable is provably provable, which makes sense. But if you take □ to be a statement about what an agent knows, you may not want to say that if an agent knows something, it knows that it knows it.

See the next post for an example of applying logic to security, a logic with lots of modal operators and axioms. But for now, we’ll focus on how to typeset the box and diamond operators.

LaTeX

In LaTeX, the most obvious commands would be \box and \diamond, but that doesn’t work. There is no \box command, though there is a \square command. And although there is a \diamond command, it produces a symbol much smaller than \square and so the two look odd together. The two operators are dual in the sense that

\begin{align*} \Box p &= \neg \Diamond \neg p \\ \Diamond p &= \neg \Box \neg p \end{align*}

and so they should have symbols of similar size. A better approach is to use \Box and \Diamond. Those were used in the displayed equations above.

Unicode

There are many box-like and diamond-like symbols in Unicode. It seems reasonable to use U+25A1 for box and U+25C7 for diamond. I don’t know of any more semantically appropriate characters. There are no Unicode characters with “modal” in their name, for example.

HTML

You can always insert Unicode characters into HTML by using &#x, followed by the hexadecimal value of the codepoint, followed by a semicolon. For example, I typed □ and ◇ to enter the box and diamond symbols above.

If you want to stick to HTML entities because they’re easier to remember, you’re mostly out of luck. There is no HTML entity for the box operator. There is an entity ◊ for “lozenge,” the typographical term for a diamond. This HTML entity corresponds to U+25CA and is smaller than U+25c7 recommended above. As discussed in the context of LaTeX, you want the box and diamond operators to have a similar size.

Related posts

Fraktur symbols in mathematics

When mathematicians run out of symbols, they turn to other alphabets. Most math symbols are Latin or Greek letters, but occasionally you’ll run into Russian or Hebrew letters.

Sometimes math uses a new font rather than a new alphabet, such as Fraktur. This is common in Lie groups when you want to associate related symbols to a Lie group and its Lie algebra. By convention a Lie group is denoted by an ordinary Latin letter and its associated Lie algebra is denoted by the same letter in Fraktur font.

lower case alphabet in Fraktur

LaTeX

To produce Fraktur letters in LaTeX, load the amssymb package and use the command \mathfrak{}.

Symbols such as \mathfrak{A} are math symbols and can only be used in math mode. They are not intended to be a substitute for setting text in Fraktur font. This is consistent with the semantic distinction in Unicode described below.

Unicode

The Unicode standard tries to distinguish the appearance of a symbol from its semantics, though there are compromises. For example, the Greek letter Ω has Unicode code point U+03A9 but the symbol Ω for electrical resistance in Ohms is U+2621 even though they are rendered the same [1].

The letters a through z, rendered in Fraktur font and used as mathematical symbols, have Unicode values U+1D51E through U+1D537. These values are in the “Supplementary Multilingual Plane” and do not commonly have font support [2].

The corresponding letters A through Z are encoded as U+1D504 through U+1D51C, though interestingly a few letters are missing. The code point U+1D506, which you’d expect to be Fraktur C, is reserved. The spots corresponding to H, I, and R are also reserved. Presumably these are reserved because they are not commonly used as mathematical symbols. However, the corresponding bold versions U+1D56C through U+ID585 have no such gaps [3].

Footnotes

[1] At least they usually are. A font designer could choose provide different glyphs for the two symbols. I used the same character for both because some I thought some readers might not see the Ohm symbol properly rendered.

[2] If you have the necessary fonts installed you should see the alphabet in Fraktur below:
𝔞 𝔟 𝔠 𝔡 𝔢 𝔣 𝔤 𝔥 𝔦 𝔧 𝔨 𝔩 𝔪 𝔫 𝔬 𝔭 𝔮 𝔯 𝔰 𝔱 𝔲 𝔳 𝔴 𝔵 𝔶 𝔷

I can see these symbols from my desktop and from my iPhone, but not from my Android tablet. Same with the symbols below.

[3] Here are the bold upper case and lower case Fraktur letters in Unicode:
𝕬 𝕭 𝕮 𝕯 𝕰 𝕱 𝕲 𝕳 𝕴 𝕵 𝕶 𝕷 𝕸 𝕹 𝕺 𝕻 𝕼 𝕽 𝕾 𝕿 𝖀 𝖁 𝖂 𝖃 𝖄 𝖅
𝖆 𝖇 𝖈 𝖉 𝖊 𝖋 𝖌 𝖍 𝖎 𝖏 𝖐 𝖑 𝖒 𝖓 𝖔 𝖕 𝖖 𝖗 𝖘 𝖙 𝖚 𝖛 𝖜 𝖝 𝖞 𝖟

Putting a brace under something in LaTeX

Here’s a useful LaTeX command that I learned about recently: \underbrace.

It does what it sounds like it does. It puts a brace under its argument.

I used this a few days ago in the post on the new prime record when I wanted to show that the record prime is written in hexadecimal as a 1 followed by a long string of Fs.

1\underbrace{\mbox{FFF \ldots FFF}}_\mbox{{\normalsize 9,308.229 F's}}

The code that produced is is

1\underbrace{\mbox{FFF \ldots FFF}}_\mbox{{\normalsize 9,308.229 F's}}

The sizing is a little confusing. Without \normalsize the text under the brace would be as large as the text above.

Why don’t you simply use XeTeX?

From an FAQ post I wrote a few years ago:

This may seem like an odd question, but it’s actually one I get very often. On my TeXtip twitter account, I include tips on how to create non-English characters such as using \AA to produce Å. Every time someone will ask “Why not use XeTeX and just enter these characters?”

If you can “just enter” non-English characters, then you don’t need a tip. But a lot of people either don’t know how to do this or don’t have a convenient way to do so. Most English speakers only need to type foreign characters occasionally, and will find it easier, for example, to type \AA or \ss than to learn how to produce Å or ß from a keyboard. If you frequently need to enter Unicode characters, and know how to do so, then XeTeX is great.

One does not simply type Unicode characters.

Related posts:

Notes on HTML, XML, TeX, and Unicode

This week’s resource post: some notes on typesetting, Unicode, etc.

See also blog posts tagged LaTeX, HTML, and Unicode.

For daily tips on LaTeX and typography, follow @TeXtip on Twitter.

TeXtip logo

Last week: C++ resources

Next week: Special functions

 

Haskell analog of Sweave and Pweave

Sweave and Pweave are programs that let you embed R and Python code respectively into LaTeX files. You can display the source code, the result of running the code, or both.

lhs2TeX is roughly the Haskell analog of Sweave and Pweave.  This post takes the sample code I wrote for Sweave and Pweave before and gives a lhs2TeX counterpart.

\documentclass{article}
%include polycode.fmt
%options ghci
\long\def\ignore#1{}
\begin{document}

Invisible code that sets the value of the variable $a$.

\ignore{
\begin{code}
a = 3.14
\end{code}
}

Visible code that sets $b$ and squares it. 

(There doesn't seem to be a way to display the result of a block of code directly. 
Seems you have to save the result and display it explicitly in an eval statement.)

\begin{code}
b = 3.15
c = b*b
\end{code}

$b^2$ = \eval{c}

Calling Haskell inline: $\sqrt{2} = \eval{sqrt 2}$

Recalling the variable $a$ set above: $a$ = \eval{a}.

\end{document}

If you save this code to a file foo.lhs, you can run

lhs2TeX -o foo.tex foo.lhs

to create a LaTeX file foo.tex which you could then compile with pdflatex.

One gotcha that I ran into is that your .lhs file must contain at least one code block, though the code block may be empty. You cannot just have code in \eval statements.

Unlike R and Python, the Haskell language itself has a notion of literate programming. Haskell specifies a format for literate comments. lhs2TeX is a popular tool for processing literate Haskell files but not the only one.

Commutative diagrams in LaTeX

There are numerous packages for creating commutative diagrams in LaTeX. My favorite, based on my limited experience, is Paul Taylor’s package. Another popular package is tikz-cd.

To install Paul Taylor’s package on Windows, I created a directory called localtexmf, set the environment variable TEXINPUTS to its location, and copied diagrams.sty file in that directory.

Here are a couple examples, diagrams used in the definition of product and coproduct.

And here’s the LaTeX to produce the diagrams.

\begin{diagram}
& & X & & \\
& \ldTo^{f_1} & \dDashto_f & \rdTo^{f_2} & \\
A & \lTo_{\pi_1} & A\times B & \rTo_{\pi_2} & B \\
\end{diagram}

\begin{diagram}
& & X & & \\
& \ruTo^{f_1} & \uDashto_f & \luTo^{f_2} & \\
A & \rTo_{i_1} & A\oplus B & \lTo_{i_2} & B \\
\end{diagram}

For much more information, see the package page.

RelatedApplied category theory

Unicode to LaTeX

I’ve run across a couple web sites that let you enter a LaTeX symbol and get back its Unicode value. But I didn’t find a site that does the reverse, going from Unicode to LaTeX, so I wrote my own.

Unicode / LaTeX Conversion

If you enter Unicode, it will return LaTeX. If you enter LaTeX, it will return Unicode. It interprets a string starting with “U+” as a Unicode code point, and a string starting with a backslash as a LaTeX command.

screenshot of www.johndcook.com/unicode_latex.png

For example, the screenshot above shows what happens if you enter U+221E and click “convert.” You could also enter infty and get back U+221E.

However, if you go from Unicode to LaTeX to Unicode, you won’t always end up where you started. There may be multiple Unicode values that map to a single LaTeX symbol. This is because Unicode is semantic and LaTeX is not. For example, Unicode distinguishes between the Greek letter Ω and the symbol Ω for ohms, the unit of electrical resistance, but LaTeX does not.

* * *

For daily tips on LaTeX and typography, follow @TeXtip on Twitter.

TeXtip logo