Monthly Archives: April 2009

Success in 8 words

Richard St. John gave a three-minute presentation at TED on the secrets of success, summarizing his interviews of 500 successful people. His outline: Passion Work Good Focus Push Serve Ideas Persist Related posts: Redbelt problem solving Don’t try to be

Posted in Creativity

Glowing jellyfish aid cancer research

The latest episode of the Science and the Sea podcast explains how a protein that gives a certain species of jellyfish a faint glow is useful in research into cancer and other diseases. Related posts: Cartoon guide to cancer research

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Posted in Science

Music recommendations

I’ve started a new page to list CDs for music mentioned here.

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Posted in Music

Four reasons to use Bayesian inference

The following is a direct quote from Anthony O’Hagan’s book Bayesian Inference. I’ve edited the quote only to enumerate the points. Why should one use Bayesian inference, as opposed to classical inference? There are various answers. Broadly speaking, some of

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Posted in Statistics

Taking questions

The previous post was an answer to a reader question. I would like to write more posts answering questions you have. Please send me your questions or suggestions for blog posts. You might ask me something I don’t know or

Posted in Uncategorized

Converting miles to degrees longitude or latitude

Someone sent me email regarding my online calculator for computing the distance between to locations given their longitude and latitude values. He wants to do sort of the opposite. Starting with the longitude and latitude of one location, he wants

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Posted in Math, Python

Best podcast intro music

Here are three of my favorite podcast intro themes. .NET Rocks by Carl Franklin and Richard Campbell. Carl Franklin composed the intro theme, Toy Boy, and recorded the song with his brother Jay. The tune is catchy, the words are

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Posted in Music

51st Carnival of Mathematics posted

The long-awaited 51st Carnival of Mathematics is up at squareCircleZ.

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Posted in Math

Cartoon about my job

Everybody thinks Dilbert is about their job. But this cartoon really is about my job. It does a remarkably good job of summarizing what it’s like to work in cancer research. Related posts on cancer research

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Posted in Science

Do you really want to be indispensable?

One strategy for increasing job security is to make yourself indispensable by never documenting anything. Deliberately following such a strategy is unethical. Passively falling into such a situation is more understandable, and more common, but it’s not very smart either.

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Posted in Business, Software development

Why proof by pattern of examples doesn’t work

Draw a few points on a circle and then draw a straight line from every point to every other point. Count the number of regions created. 2 points, 2 regions. 3 points, 4 regions. 4 points, 8 regions. 5 points,

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Posted in Math

Tim Bray’s high-tech monastic cell

Nicholas Carr has an interesting post entitled simply Clutter. The post begins by discussing Tim Bray’s vision of a sort of high-tech monastic cell and moves into an explanation of why electronic books are fundamentally different from paper books. Tim

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Posted in Uncategorized

Dave Brubeck mass

Judging from the comments on previous posts, it seems a good number of Dave Brubeck fans read this blog. Everyone familiar with Dave Brubeck knows about Take Five from his album Time Out. But I wonder how many know about

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Posted in Music

Status report questions

The latest .NET Rocks podcast interviews Pat Hynds on why projects fail. Toward the end of his interview he mentions a simple template for status reports. What did you work on? What did you get done? What did you do

Posted in Business, Science, Software development

Bayesian statistics is misnamed

I’m teaching an introduction to Bayesian statistics. My first thought was to start with Bayes theorem, as many introductions do. But this isn’t the right starting point. Bayes’ theorem is an indispensable tool for Bayesian statistics, but it is not

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Posted in Statistics