The 3n+1 problem and Benford’s law

This is the third, and last, of a series of posts on Benford’s law, this time looking at a famous open problem in computer science, the 3n + 1 problem, also known as the Collatz conjecture. Start with a positive integer n. Compute 3n + 1 and divide by 2 repeatedly until you get an odd […]

Cauchy, Benford, and a problem with NHST

Introduction Samples from a Cauchy distribution nearly follow Benford’s law. I’ll demonstrate this below. The more data you see, the more confident you should be of this. But with a typical statistical approach, crudely applied NHST (null hypothesis significance testing), the more data you see, the less convinced you are. This post assumes you’ve read the […]

Benford’s law and SciPy

Imagine you picked up a dictionary and found that the pages with A’s were dirty and the Z’s were clean. In between there was a gradual transition with the pages becoming cleaner as you progressed through the alphabet. You might conclude that people have been looking up a lot of words that begin with letters […]

Leading digits and quadmath

My previous post looked at a problem that requires repeatedly finding the first digit of kn where k is a single digit but n may be on the order of millions or billions. The most direct approach would be to first compute kn as a very large integer, then find it’s first digit. That approach […]

Gelfand’s question

Gelfands’s question asks whether there is a positive integer n such that the first digits of jn base 10 are all the same for j = 2, 3, 4, …, 9. (Thanks to @republicofmath for pointing out this problem.) This post will explore Gelfand’s question via probability. The MathWorld article on Gelfand’s question says that […]